5 Things You Need To Know About Bounce Rate

5 Things You Need To Know About Bounce Rate

5 Things You Need To Know About Bounce Rate

5 Things You Need To Know About Bounce Rate

Home > Giant Wednesday

Digital Marketing, technology & business insights, how to’s and explainer videos, released on a Wednesday. Make sure to subscribe to be notified and sign up to our mailing list! 🎥

See below, the transcript from this episode of Giant Wednesday if videos aren’t your preferred method to consume digital skills. See also the Giant Cheat Sheet from this episode.

If you want to know more, get in touch today 😎

What is bounce rate? 🤔

How can I lower my bounce rate? 🤔

What do I need to know about bounce rate? 🤔

Well… let’s start it off light;

Why did the marketer get off the trampoline? He was worried about his bounce rate! Ba dum tss…

Terrible jokes aside, hey, I’m Sam and I’m here today to explain bounce rate, why it’s important, how to lower it and how context is king.

So, let’s kick this off with the first question:

 

What is bounce rate?

Well, according to Google… 

“A bounce is a single-page session on your site”

This ‘bounce’ is calculated, specifically, as a session that triggers only a single request to the analytics server your site sits on – for example, someone opens up your latest blog on your site, gives it a read and then pops (or bounces) off.

The ‘bounce rate’ is calculated by the total number of single-page sessions divided by all sessions.

So with that explained, I want to share five things with you about your bounce rate!

 

Where Do I Find Bounce Rate?

In Google Analytics you can find your bounce rate by going to Audience Overview and then clicking the metric ‘Bounce Rate’. That’ll give you a view of your overall bounce rate for your whole site. 

If you want to look at the percentage for specific pages, you’d instead head to the All Pages report to filter by individual pages. 

You can also look at your bounce rate by location, by source, by landing page, and a whole other host of factors.

This brings me onto our next point – without considering the context, bounce rate is just a number and not an insight.

 

Context Is Vital With Bounce Rate

Bounce rates could vary by country and area, for example. If your company only serves the UK, views from Germany may bounce when they realise you don’t operate in their area. In this case, your bounce rate could look high, but the reason why is clear.

We can also expect that new visitors are likely to have a higher bounce rate as they might just be in the research phase, or visiting your site for a particular reason like a blog.

Returning visitors, on the other hand, are usually there because they’re interested in your content or offering and therefore are likely to have a lower bounce rate.

A high bounce rate does not always indicate a real problem either. In some cases, it simply shows that you’ve answered the user’s query – they got what they wanted and continued on with their day. 

They might now at least be aware of your brand and come to you for info again.

And, if you’ve got remarketing set up, then you can even encourage that kind of action.

To flip it and reverse it though, a shockingly low bounce rate is not necessarily a cause for celebration.

If your bounce rate is below 20%, it’s likely that your analytics are broken.

It would be unwise to assume that a bounce rate above 50%, for example, is a complete catastrophe. In fact, 41 to 55% is roughly average.

However, it does mean that the visitor hasn’t taken any further action, which is obviously not what you want. They haven’t gone to another page on your site or completed a transaction. So what could be the reason why people aren’t sticking around?

 

What Can Influence Bounce Rate?

Well, that’s a big question! And the honest answer is that there could be a whole host of reasons. 

But some such reasons could be: 

  • Your webpage has a slow load time
  • There’s no call to action to keep them going through
  • Poor formatting
  • Misleading titles
  • Your website isn’t optimised for mobile
  • 404 pages
  • Your forms aren’t working

So essentially if your website is broken, or not considered, it’s unlikely to play in your favour.

 

Why Is Bounce Rate Important?

Well, in terms of rankings, you should know that your bounce rate is not actually a ranking factor for Google.

That means that when they crawl your site, they aren’t finding your high bounce rate and moving you straight to page 30.

But, and this is a big but (giggle)- we know that Google does use some engagement signals for SEO. We just don’t know what they are – they’re quite elusive there.

What we do know, as we’ve discovered, is what our bounce rate is.

And we can use this, with context in mind, as one of the signals that can indicate levels of engagement to us.

The goal shouldn’t really be to lower your bounce rate. It should instead be to make sure your visitors are satisfied with what you present to them – that you answer their query, that it’s relevant, and that the page is optimised for user experience.

So take a look at your higher bounce rate pages and make some observations. 

Optimising for these things will in turn lower your bounce rate.

 

How Can I Lower My Bounce Rate?

Other than the methods I’ve already mentioned, there are a few other ways to try to lower your bounce rate.

As we talked about, answering the visitor’s query is great – but bouncing is not so great… unless you’re Tigger, who we can’t show on the screen for copyright reasons.

If you want to get them to stick around, you might like to try offering a short snippet of info on the page that does give them a quick answer… but then, look! You also have a fantastic, in-depth guide on the exact thing they were looking for. 

If, for example, your site had regular blog, news, or content updates, you can integrate a ‘similar articles’ widget that makes them want to click over to some of your other, awesome content.

You can even just make a conscious effort to add valuable, relevant links throughout your content to take users off on an adventure of relevancy and delight relating to their query.

Finally, make sure your CTAs count. Remove the ‘buy now’, ‘add to cart’ generic-ness and add some of your brand’s personality into these buttons – let the user know what they’re getting, and make it their decision to click.

 

So, when you take context into account and prioritise user engagement and satisfaction over mere numbers, you’ll start to see your bounce rate lowering in turn.

 

Fancy getting brand new episodes of Giant Wednesday to your inbox? Fill in the form below and we’ll keep you updated with the latest digital skills 👇

Want to know more?

Reach out and say hello. Come experience the GIANT side.

Sign Up For More

Stay up to date with the latest happenings, learnings, events & more with our GIANT Newsletters.

Contact Us

Top Floor, The Civic Centre, Castle Hill Avenue, Folkestone CT20 2QY.

 Show me directions

 01303 240715

 Send us a message

Copyright © 2021 Sleeping Giant Media. All Rights Reserved.

Google Display Network Explained

Google Display Network Explained

Google Display Network Explained

Google Display Network Explained

Home > Giant Wednesday

Digital Marketing, technology & business insights, how to’s and explainer videos, released on a Wednesday. Make sure to subscribe to be notified and sign up to our mailing list! 🎥

See below, the transcript from this episode of Giant Wednesday if videos aren’t your preferred method to consume digital skills. See also the Giant Cheat Sheet from this episode.

If you want to know more, get in touch today 😎

Have you ever been followed around the internet by an ad for the pair of shoes you really want but convinced yourself you can’t treat yourself to this side of payday… 

It’s equal parts glorious and… annoying, right?

Well, that’s more than likely an ad that displays on the Google Display Network!

So hey, I’m Max, and if you want to understand how to run ads like this, or know a bit more about the network, then stick around for this week’s Giant Wednesday.

 

Pay Per Click, or PPC ads, whether they’re in the search or display format, can help you appear in all stages of the marketing funnel to your target audience.

It makes them pretty versatile in your digital marketing strategy.

And through the Google Display Network, your ads can reach up to 90% of internet users through things like websites, videos and apps.

It’s one of the best ways to help your ads achieve their full potential, designed to help your display adverts reach your target audience wherever they might be in the digital sphere.

The Google Display Network is made up of over two million sites and as I said, has the potential to reach almost all internet users.

That can sound quite overwhelming, how can you set up ads for that many potential placements, or even have control on that kind of mass?

Thankfully, it can be pretty controlled and you have the power to decide when and where your ads might place.

You can do this by optimising your campaign’s settings through the three main ad group targeting options; audience targeting, automated targeting and contextual targeting.

Let’s explore those further, shall we?

 

Contextual targeting uses keywords or topics that you have selected as a way to match your display ads to relevant sites.

Keywords are typically individual words, whilst a topic is more of a concept or a central theme.

Once you’ve added these into the ad groups in your Display Network campaigns, Google’s algorithm will then analyse the content of each web page or URL that falls under its network.

This is where text, language, link structure and page structure are taken into account before your ad is placed on a site that matches the content keywords or topics you’ve selected.  

So if you only wanted your ad with a sale on that particular shoe to appear on fashion retailer sites when you know you’re the only one with a sale on that item right now, you can make that happen by setting the context for placement!

Clever, right?

 

Audience targeting, however, offers more details when it comes to targeting.

You can reach audiences based on their interests and habits, the demographics they fall under, what they’ve been researching or how they’ve interacted with your brand. 

These audiences allow you to reach new customers while options like customer match using your CRM data or remarketing help you to reach existing customers.

Once you’ve put together these audiences, the Google Display Network chooses your ad placements based on what videos, apps and sites your customers are spending their time on.

I mean, is there any better digital real estate than right in front of potential customers?

Or, alternatively, you could opt for automated targeting.

This type of targeting removes most of the input required from you and instead focuses on getting more conversions by finding audiences based on your existing audiences and landing page.

This targeting optimises itself, which is useful, as Google Ads learns more about which audience performs best with your adverts.

Automated bidding can then use the millions of signals it registers per auction to find the user who is most likely to convert

Not all ads work with every ad placement available, however, the Google Display Network allows you to exclude any sites, videos, content types or topics that aren’t a good fit for your brand.

If you tend to stick to search ads as opposed to display ads, and are pretty familiar with Google’s Search Network, you might be wondering whether display ads are right for you?

Well, whilst the Search Network is great for reaching users who are already looking for your products or services, the Display Network is ideal for helping you catch the attention of someone who might be a bit earlier in the marketing funnel and hasn’t reached the research stage yet.

For example, they have a recent interest in garden renovation, and you could use audience targeting to show clever display ads about your sale on garden fences before they’d even thought about replacing or updating them.

 

The display network is also great for reminding users of what they’ve previously expressed an interest in by using remarketing ads to target people who’ve visited your site or interacted with a product in a certain way.

For example, the shoes I mentioned at the beginning… they’re just trying to remind us of how much we wanted them because we took them in and out of our basket a few times…

Anyway, that was a breakdown of how the ads in the Google Display Network and its targeting options work so go forth and spice up your advertising.

Oh, and treat yourself to that pair of shoes…

Fancy getting brand new episodes of Giant Wednesday to your inbox? Fill in the form below and we’ll keep you updated with the latest digital skills 👇

Want to know more?

Reach out and say hello. Come experience the GIANT side.

Sign Up For More

Stay up to date with the latest happenings, learnings, events & more with our GIANT Newsletters.

Contact Us

Top Floor, The Civic Centre, Castle Hill Avenue, Folkestone CT20 2QY.

 Show me directions

 01303 240715

 Send us a message

Copyright © 2021 Sleeping Giant Media. All Rights Reserved.

Identifying Your USP And Standing Out From Competitors Online

Identifying Your USP And Standing Out From Competitors Online

Identifying Your USP And Standing Out From Competitors Online

Identifying Your USP And Standing Out From Competitors Online

Home > Giant Wednesday

Digital Marketing, technology & business insights, how to’s and explainer videos, released on a Wednesday. Make sure to subscribe to be notified and sign up to our mailing list! 🎥

See below, the transcript from this episode of Giant Wednesday if videos aren’t your preferred method to consume digital skills. See also the Giant Cheat Sheet from this episode.

If you want to know more, get in touch today 😎

Standing out is something none of us wanted to really do in school… but all want to do in business.

With so many businesses out there, there’s bound to be a need to stand out, even from those that don’t offer the same products or services you do.

And this is even more important when it comes to online.

So hey, I’m Danny, I’m going to explore how we identify what makes a business stand out online in this week’s Giant Wednesday.

It’s no longer the case that you need to ready yourself to stand out online, it is the case, full stop.

Pretty much all businesses are online in one form or another these days, and standing out is a matter of survival.

It’s also something you’re going to need to put continued, evolved efforts into as the world of business, digital and… well, the state of the world evolves around us.

Identifying how you can stand out from the competition means you need to be checking out what your competitors and surrounding companies are doing.

So let’s start with a question: what makes you stand out?

I don’t mean you personally, I mean your business. 

 

Imagine you’ve got a shop, you sell children’s toys. What would make your brand different from others?

Maybe your storefront is really brightly painted, with a snazzy window display and someone demonstrating the toys you sell outside on the street. 

I’m pretty sure that would grab some attention as people walk by!

Well, the same is true in digital and when we identify what makes us different from the competition online, we call that our unique selling point or USP.

This can be clear, to the point statement that describes the benefits you offer as a business, how you might solve your customer needs and what distinguishes you from the competition.

For example, you might only sell environmentally friendly toys, all recycled, all uni-sex and hand made in the local area.

That’s definitely a USP and something you can use to your advantage when marketing and standing out online.

 

To help you define your USP, ask yourself these questions

  • Who is my target audience?
  • Who are my competitors?
  • What problems do my audience have?
  • How can I solve them?

 

Ask yourself these questions, note down your answers and you’ll be able to string together a concise statement that becomes your USP. 

For example, as the toy business, your target audience is probably parents or people with children in their lives. 

Your competitors are likely other toy shops or some big brand companies that sell toys at lower prices. 

Your target audience are probably looking for ethical, sustainable and hardwearing toys that will last a long time and come from a business they can trust. 

And you can provide that with your locally made, environmentally friendly products and a trusting online presence.

So your USP would be that you provide hard-wearing, long-lasting, sustainably and locally made children toys with a customer service guarantee. 

 

Your USP should be something you display on your website, your social media and other marketing materials, as if it becomes your tag line!

Letting potential customers know from the get-go what makes you different from the competition.

These ways of thinking will help you address your own unique selling points, but also help you understand those of your competitors – really helping give you an advantage in standing out.

Once you’ve worked out your USP, the next step is seeing new potential avenues to stand out from competitors online

So why don’t you look at things like:

  • Whether they have a social media presence 
  • Where they appear in search engine results for relating search terms
  • Whether they’re running adverts on social media 
  • What kind of content they’re posting 
  • Whether people are talking about them online

All of this is useful information to help inform your own online and marketing activity and all topics we cover in other episodes of Giant Wednesday so check them out.

An optimised, present and active online presence will only do you favours! 

 

In an always-on, fast-growing world, standing out by knowing your unique offering, being where your competitors are and aren’t, and tailoring everything you do to customer needs and pain points will stand you out.

Fancy getting brand new episodes of Giant Wednesday to your inbox? Fill in the form below and we’ll keep you updated with the latest digital skills 👇

Want to know more?

Reach out and say hello. Come experience the GIANT side.

Sign Up For More

Stay up to date with the latest happenings, learnings, events & more with our GIANT Newsletters.

Contact Us

Top Floor, The Civic Centre, Castle Hill Avenue, Folkestone CT20 2QY.

 Show me directions

 01303 240715

 Send us a message

Copyright © 2021 Sleeping Giant Media. All Rights Reserved.

Adobe Creative Cloud Apps Explained: For Your Marketing

Adobe Creative Cloud Apps Explained: For Your Marketing

Adobe Creative Cloud Apps For Marketing

Adobe Creative Cloud Apps For Marketing

Home > Giant Wednesday

Digital Marketing, technology & business insights, how to’s and explainer videos, released on a Wednesday. Make sure to subscribe to be notified and sign up to our mailing list! 🎥

See below, the transcript from this episode of Giant Wednesday if videos aren’t your preferred method to consume digital skills. See also the Giant Cheat Sheet from this episode.

If you want to know more, get in touch today 😎

If you’re looking to create some sweet new content for your business to help with your marketing, you really don’t need to look any further than the Adobe Suite.

But with so many separate programs to choose from, which one is best for you?

P.S. This is no way endorsed, I’m just a big fan.

Well let’s find out, I’m Alex, and this Giant Wednesday. 

 

It used to be several years ago that you had to buy Adobe programs separately, or as a bundle, but you were basically locked into one version of the program, with the need to upgrade every time Adobe brought out some shiny new features.

Bring on the pain of moving the old version you paid for into the recycling bin…

But thanks to Adobe’s clever marketing, the Creative Cloud (or CC) is a subscription service that gives you access to the latest tools and programs from the Adobe arsenal.

So long as you are subscribed, you always have access to the latest versions and the best tools for your content creation.

But with great power, comes great… confusion?

If you’re new to the incredible possibilities of Adobe software, you may be a little intimidated by the level of choice.

So let’s go through the big dogs of the Creative Cloud and see how they can each help take your marketing to new heights.

 

Photoshop For Marketing

So unless you’ve been living under a rock, you should have a fairly basic idea of what Photoshop is. I mean, it’s literally become a term in the dictionary.

Photoshop is the program to use when you want to easily edit your photos and create new graphics for your website or marketing materials.

Within Photoshop, you can edit existing photos to adjust the lighting and then save them as a format that works for you. Even doing fancy things like removing backgrounds, which we’ve covered in an episode of Giant Wednesday Creative!

You can also easily change the dimensions of an image, and use the Save for Web feature to save a high-quality image, with a low file size – perfect for web graphics.

 

Illustrator For Marketing

So when I first started as a content creator, I always ignored Illustrator because I thought it was similar to Photoshop. But this isn’t the case! Illustrator is a fantastic program for creating vector graphics.

Let’s explain the difference;

Programs like photoshop work with raster graphics, which is basically pixel data. This means that the dimensions of your image are finite, and if you blow it up too big, or zoom in too far, you’re going to end up with a screen full of pixels.

Programs like Illustrator deal with vector graphics, which is basically your computer doing quick maths to follow a path, so the graphics can be rendered at any size – you want your graphics on the side of a skyscraper? No problem!

This is because, behind the scenes, the data being created by Illustrator is instructions, rather than an actual graphic itself. 

Use Illustrator for campaigns where you want the same branding across multiple file-formats, for example, a flyer, your landing page and a poster. You can load both up in the same screen and easily copy graphics and colours across from one to the other.

If you’re making a logo, we’d recommend using Illustrator too, as many print companies these days will only accept files in .ai or .svg format, which you can only really get out of Illustrator… 

You can create entire artboards with all of your company graphics and logos in one place – ready to export at whatever size is needed.

 

InDesign For Marketing

You’re joking, not another one? 

I never joke about creative software. InDesign is the program to use for publishing and typesetting. In other words, the composition and layout of text.

If you’re putting together a brochure or magazine that’s very text-heavy, you’re going to want to be good friends with InDesign. 

Within InDesign, you can easily layout text into multiple columns, control things like line spacing, and even make text curve around images if you’re really clever!

You can create documents with multiple pages so you can see your whole project at a glance. 

You can then easily export out as a PDF in a colour format that’s ready for physical print, or online viewing.

 

Premiere Pro For Marketing

Okay, you may be pleased to hear this one isn’t an image or text editing piece of software.

Premiere Pro is the program for you for all of your video editing and GIF making needs.

We edit all of our episodes of Giant Wednesday within Premiere Pro, so if you’re a fan of the series, you can kind of get an idea of what you can do with the software.

Within Premiere Pro, you can import image, video, and audio files and stitch them together into a movie masterpiece, with full control over the video dimension and format for whatever social media platform you wish.

You can even now automatically add subtitles to your video which is an absolute gamechanger and something you shouldn’t definitely be doing!

If you’re interested in learning the basics of how to use Premiere Pro, check out this video which will give you a quick introduction to the key features!

 

After Effects For Marketing

Even among experienced marketers, After Effects can be intimidating, but once you get the hang of it, you can use it to make your content even more dynamic. 

After Effects is a digital visual effects, motion graphics, and compositing application.

You can build a brand new composition from scratch, complete with animated text and graphics, or add to an existing video – you want to have a lightsaber in your latest piece of content? Wish granted!

Again, if you want to learn the basics of this beast, we’ve got you covered in this previous episode – aren’t we kind?

After Effects is a great tool to add some extra dimension to your motion-based marketing materials and really stand out.

 

So, that was a quick look at five of the main Adobe programmes that we use for the creation of our marketing materials on and offline.

Each programme has its own benefits for your marketing, however, they are a whole new language to learn so get ready for lots of confusing buttons and options.

If you want your marketing materials to stand out, then mastering these programmes will help.

But if the price tags put you off, then I’d say to you that it is a worthwhile investment…  however there are free tools out there, though limited, that can give you a taste for what’s available.

Fancy getting brand new episodes of Giant Wednesday to your inbox? Fill in the form below and we’ll keep you updated with the latest digital skills 👇

Want to know more?

Reach out and say hello. Come experience the GIANT side.

Sign Up For More

Stay up to date with the latest happenings, learnings, events & more with our GIANT Newsletters.

Contact Us

Top Floor, The Civic Centre, Castle Hill Avenue, Folkestone CT20 2QY.

 Show me directions

 01303 240715

 Send us a message

Copyright © 2021 Sleeping Giant Media. All Rights Reserved.

Why Your Digital Marketing Strategy Should Be An Integrated One

Why Your Digital Marketing Strategy Should Be An Integrated One

The Benefits Of An Integrated & Holistic Marketing Strategy

The Benefits Of An Integrated & Holistic Marketing Strategy

Home > Giant Wednesday

Digital Marketing, technology & business insights, how to’s and explainer videos, released on a Wednesday. Make sure to subscribe to be notified and sign up to our mailing list! 🎥

See below, the transcript from this episode of Giant Wednesday if videos aren’t your preferred method to consume digital skills. See also the Giant Cheat Sheet from this episode.

If you want to know more, get in touch today 😎

What do you call a marketeer with lots of different marketing strategies all on the go at once?

I don’t know Danny, What do you call a marketeer with lots of different marketing strategies all on the go at once??

Stressed the fuck out.

It’s time to take those separate marketing plans, and integrate them! Wanna find out more, stick around for this week’s Giant Wednesday.

There was a time as a marketeer where running an advert meant an upbeat jingle on the radio, a half-page spread in the local rag or a CTA packed 30 seconds on TV but my how times have changed, and with the domination of digital channels taking over our lives, ensuring your digital strategy, ties up with your….. ‘Non’ digital strategy, is key.

The act of digital marketing is to ‘‘Achieving marketing objectives through applying digital technologies and media.’ obvious enough right, and can consist of Company websites, Mobile apps, Social media company pages, Search Engines, Advertising, Email and automation Or even digital Partnerships with other digital companies

However, to be truly successful, digital strategies must be integrated with traditional forms of marketing to create a  ‘multichannel marketing strategy’ ouuuuuu..

A report from last year found that nearly half of companies don’t have a clearly defined digital marketing strategy let alone integrating it into the overall marketing strategy. 

About 12% are still using a separate digital document, which is still very much only the first step in the fully integrated journey.

From my experience, one of the barriers to starting a digital strategy is just where to start. You don’t have to re-create war and peace. A simple 2-3 page document, highlighting the channels at your disposal whilst following the following:

  1. See – How can people see and come across my brand
  2. Think – Helping them answer questions and think about your product
  3. Do – The act of converting or convincing them to purchase
  4. Care- the aftercare to provide brand ambassadors and promote word of mouth.

I’ll assume you have an awesome digital marketing strategy in place… The next step. Is making it one holistic strategy.

But I hear you saying.. Danny, what’s the point!?

Thanks for asking, and that’s exactly the point of this video, lets go through 5 reasons why a holistic marketing strategy might be a better way to go and what could happen if you don’t.

  1. Consistency of message

If your integrated marketing strategy achieves nothing more than delivering one clear consistent message then it will still have been successful.

Why? Because as soon as your business’s message becomes blurred, unfocused, or inconsistent, you begin to lose your audience.

The importance of delivering one message consistently cannot be overstated! 

And sometimes, when we have a digital strategy and an offline strategy, this message can become blurred. 

Not only will your message always be the same, but the elements of your brand will also line up more seamlessly.

When your style guides, logos, headers, content, and voice are all working in tandem, you’re able to maximise your impact and carve out your own lane within your niche or industry.

 

  1. You become disintegrated 

It’s all too common for digital marketing activities to be completed in silos whether that’s a specialist digital marketer, sitting in IT, or a separate digital agency.

It’s easier that way to package ‘digital’ into a convenient chunk. But of course, it’s less effective.

Everyone agrees that digital media work best when integrated with traditional media and response channels.

If I see a TV advert… I might Google it in a few days.

If a flyer comes through my door, maybe I can’t remember the business name 2 weeks later, but if I remember the offer, maybe Google can help me?

 

  1. You’re wasting money and time through duplication

Even if you are the biggest business in the world, you may be wasting your resources by managing your digital and standard marketing strategies separately.

Doubling up on efforts, tools and software that can otherwise be reinvested elsewhere.

Think of it this way, it’s the difference between designing two visual campaigns instead of one integrated campaign.

A well-oiled strategy will save your business money in a number of areas.

Naturally, having a single message helps you conserve resources and reduce waste. 

You shouldn’t be creating or modifying your message each time you communicate with your customers. Instead, reduce time spent creating, and instead, maximise how you can optimise the message across all your channels.

 

  1. To Create a Consumer Experience

In a digital world, people aren’t just looking for their next new favourite product or service.

Customers want an immersive experience that is delivered on their own terms. In other words, your customers might not want direct mail or TV ad campaigns.

With an integrated marketing strategy, customers help determine how your business’s message is delivered – producing better results for your company.

For example: Being served an advert on social media for a new clothing range needs reinforcing in the real world. instore, on billboards, through famous influencers. Imagine getting to the store to find out it was an online offer only! arghhhh!

 

  1. To Focus on Results

Not only does integrated marketing reinforce the same message in the minds of your consumers, but it also keeps the message and goal crystal clear within your own business or organisation.

When all parties are working in sync, that is when you’re able to create truly impactful campaigns; and the better you’re able to communicate the same message both externally and internally, the greater your return on investment will be.

So perhaps it’s time to make digital marketing, just marketing again, and to tie up all those loose ends in one holistic marketing strategy that drives clarity for your business and its customers.

Fancy getting brand new episodes of Giant Wednesday to your inbox? Fill in the form below and we’ll keep you updated with the latest digital skills 👇

Want to know more?

Reach out and say hello. Come experience the GIANT side.

Sign Up For More

Stay up to date with the latest happenings, learnings, events & more with our GIANT Newsletters.

Contact Us

Top Floor, The Civic Centre, Castle Hill Avenue, Folkestone CT20 2QY.

 Show me directions

 01303 240715

 Send us a message

Copyright © 2021 Sleeping Giant Media. All Rights Reserved.

Disavowing Backlinks: What They Are & How To Do It

Disavowing Backlinks: What They Are & How To Do It

Disavowing Backlinks: What They Are & How To Do It

Disavowing Backlinks: What They Are & How To Do It

Home > Giant Wednesday

Digital Marketing, technology & business insights, how to’s and explainer videos, released on a Wednesday. Make sure to subscribe to be notified and sign up to our mailing list! 🎥

See below, the transcript from this episode of Giant Wednesday if videos aren’t your preferred method to consume digital skills. See also the Giant Cheat Sheet from this episode.

If you want to know more, get in touch today 😎

Backlinks can REALLY straddle the line of bringing value to your site or ruining all your hard work. 

Proving to search engines that your site is trustworthy is a constant activity, but disavowing less relevant backlinks is a great start.

So hey, I’m Holly, if disavowing is a little out of your comfort zone, stick around for this week’s Giant Wednesday.

 

What is a backlink?

 

So a backlink is kind of what it says on the tin, it’s when one site links back to another.

If you’ve heard the terms “inbound” links or “incoming” links, then that’s just another way to describe a backlink.

If you were to include a link to, say, the gov.uk website to provide further information on one of your blogs, this would be a backlink to the gov.uk from your own.

Backlinks are crucial to link building which is an important part of search engine optimisation and something we’ve covered in a previous episode.

Search engines such as Google and Bing use links, among other elements and characteristics, to help determine how well your page should rank.

When they crawl your site, search engines will look at the content of your site’s pages to work out whether they qualify to rank for related keywords based on the quality of the content.

Part of this crawling process involves looking at the links from other sites that point to that page on your site, and then the quality of those sites. Something seemingly out of your control!

If multiple high-quality and high-authority sites are linking back to yours, then the search engines will deem the content on that page as high in value… alongside other seo best practice techniques too, of course.

But what happens when a site that isn’t particularly relevant or high-value links back to your site? 

Well, unfortunately, if a bunch of low-quality or spammy links pointing to your domain from a low authority site, then this can throw up red flags for Google. 

These could come from something like the purchasing of backlinks – a topic that we’ve covered before, and is bad practice that will see your site penalised. 

Essentially, if low-quality or irrelevant sites are linking back to yours, Google might be under the impression you’re up to no good.

But, before you start panicking! There are ways to get rid of these spammy or low-quality links that might not be doing you any favours.

That process is called ‘disavowing’ backlinks and I’m now going to share how you go about that for your site.

The importance of disavowing backlinks

 

In a really brief summary, it’s quite a simple process that is about assessing your current backlinks and then picking which ones you’d like to not be linking to you.

The disavowing process won’t unlink the site, but it does essentially tell Google that you don’t care about their link and not to consider it when they review linking sites.

Google can quite often assess which links to trust, after all… it’s pretty clever.

Therefore they do emphasise that this disavowing process is more for sites who’ve previously bought links or if a backlink has caused, or might cause, a manual action from Google on your site. 

But a bit of backlinking and general site housekeeping never hurt anyone! Who knows what you might find?

You can conduct your backlink disavowing through Google Search Console which you should have access to so long as you have a Google Analytics tracking tag on your site.

How to disavow backlinks

 

The first step though, you’ll need to create a list of ‘bad’ links.

To do this, you can perform a link audit which you can do with the link report feature in Google Search Console. 

Click the “Export External Link” button and choose the “More Sample Links” options before exporting it in whatever file format that works for you.

You’re now going to need to sift through the links and determine which ones you want to disavow.

This should be a bit a hefty task that will take some time, and the links you should probably disavow will probably be quite obvious to you when you go through them.

However, you should note that just because the link is coming from a low authority site, doesn’t necessarily make it a bad link.

You should only disavow a link that you know is definitely irrelevant or could harm your site’s ranking.

A good rule of thumb would be to ask the question: Does this help the site’s users?

If it has little to no value, or seems pretty shady, then the answer should be no and it shouldn’t be linking to your site. 

Reviewing the content of the sites that are linking back to you before you make your decision is always a good idea to help you get full context about its value.

Now that you’ve gotten through your huge collection of links and figured out which you do and don’t want linking to you, you’ll need to list them in a text file or .txt file.

The following rules will help ensure you’re doing this properly:

  • Each site should be on a new line
  • Each site needs to start with “domain:”

 

If, for example, you wanted to disavow three backlinks from: www.badlinks.com, www.disavowthislink.com and www.theworstbacklinkever.com 

Then your text file list would look like this:

domain:badlinks.com

domain:disavowthislink.com

domain:theworstbacklinkever.com

 

If you wanted to just blacklist a specific page instead of the entire site, then you can just add the corresponding URL. However, it’s rare that that would be the case!

Once you’ve created your text file, you can head over to the Google Disavow Tool and upload your file.

It might take a few weeks for Google to process your uploaded lists as it gets incorporated into their index as they recrawl the site and reprocess the pages they take into account.

And don’t be alarmed if you see the disavowed links still coming up in the Links Report on Search Console, as they will still appear once disavowed!

 

And there you have it, you’ve now tidied up your backlinks and understood the value of the task at hand.

Fancy getting brand new episodes of Giant Wednesday to your inbox? Fill in the form below and we’ll keep you updated with the latest digital skills 👇

Want to know more?

Reach out and say hello. Come experience the GIANT side.

Sign Up For More

Stay up to date with the latest happenings, learnings, events & more with our GIANT Newsletters.

Contact Us

Top Floor, The Civic Centre, Castle Hill Avenue, Folkestone CT20 2QY.

 Show me directions

 01303 240715

 Send us a message

Copyright © 2021 Sleeping Giant Media. All Rights Reserved.